auto-hp family womens-fashion

Customer reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
23
4.2 out of 5 stars
Numbers Do Lie: 61 Hidden Cricket Stories
Format: Kindle Edition|Change
Price:₹ 190.95


on 24 February 2017
A must read for those who want to know more about cricketing heroes. An arresting read that is insightful, besides being loaded with nostalgia. Brings meaning to numbers. I wish this book were extended to a TV show with match footage to see. Made me see my cricketing heroes in a new light.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 4 December 2017
I like it
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 11 August 2017
Religion is not logical. Cricket is a religion in India. So, cricket, unlike say, baseball, lacks clear-eyed assessment. Thankfully, this book injects some sense into madness. Great data-driven insights. Some of these (especially the section on Tendulkar) should be shown to (only enlightened) masses. The analysis, however, seems to have stopped after an initial fillip from the ideator, making later chapters appear repetitive. It is understandable since the core idea was stolen without giving adequate return to the Author and his team. If it is a labour of love then it is time for another edition. One could have so much fun with numbers especially for those who love the game but don't worship stars.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 11 June 2017
:) Numbers do not lie. Numbers do not tell the truth either.
Its people who read into numbers to lie and this is what these authors have done - knowingly or unknowingly.

They need to get their math straight first. In logic suppose we have P => Q , given Q we cannot say anything about P.
So when we see numbers and infer greatness, greatness => numbers and not vice versa, so seeing numbers there is really no absolute inference possible about the greatness. But then probabilistic inference is possible. For probabilistic inference a prior is needed and then one can arrive at a comparison by making use of the prior.

The problem with the analysts here is calibrating a function that artificially puts some people in the higher bracket and end up with wrong calculations. if X is a random variable, one can always evaluate a function f(X) that is such that when X is high f(X) is low and viceversa. so if i am a little careful in choosing a function I can make any conclusion by cutting and pasting a few functions f, g, h etc together to formulate my favorite batsmen as greater than the others.

And many naive and mathematically unsophisticated people would fall for it and take it to be some kind of elite analysis , while in actuality its simply ignorance garbed as knowledge.

marred by standard management misnomers like "it is a team sport" [ya it is, but you do not evaluate players based on team success. ] , "ultimately victory matters" [ya it does but do you have a negative impact when one player plays it really well and others spoil the game by failing the match ] ... these are management jargon without meaning ... how about taking a negative impact ? invert all scores, make them -X if score is X and change loss to victory and vice versa and calculate your impact index. you shall get another statistical quantity ... how about summing these to see how players figure out ?

in any case subjectivity comes in through two interesting by routes : one is the impact index function thats calculated , the other is through what statistical attributes contribute and what do not. this is very big issue. in machine learning its called feature selection and many cases the features selected are wrong or their interrelationship is misread and here its glaringly obvious. If you are looking to create a start up here is my advice: try deep learning for representation learning and you shall get a much better approach.

On the whole the logic is weak and meaningless ! I am convinced t hat if you try averages and variance etc you would get better analysis than this.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 17 May 2017
What a book... Liked the perspective of Author and the creator of impact index...

Although Amazon's Packing ruined its top right corner a little. But still a good to read book....
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 11 October 2017
Not finished yet. But good thinking and very different analysis. Gives a different perspective of the game and strategies thereof
0Comment| 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 6 September 2017
Such fun and thrilled to read this book.Especially when AAKASH STATISTION CHOPRA analysis the data , And it's a fact that not every time scoreboard telling you the whole tale.and that impact index is just an awesome thing.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 19 March 2017
A completely different 'spin' on the game. Jaideep and his team open up the world of cricket stats.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 4 July 2017
The book has interesting facts which show true value of players to the team .great read.innovative. impact is important in team sport .
0Comment| 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 8 May 2017
Impact Index is really very interesting. It looks at cricket records with a different angle. It tell some very interesting insides on various players. My favorite story is Peter May
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse