100% PP 100%25%20PP
Currently unavailable.
We don't know when or if this item will be back in stock.
List & Earn Rs.250* extra. Available in Bangalore, Mumbai, Chennai, Hyderabad. Sell on Local Finds.
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more.
See all 2 images

Samayal - The Pleasures of South Indian Vegetarian Cooking. Paperback – 20 Sep 2010


See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from
Paperback, 20 Sep 2010
click to open popover

Description for Samayal - The Pleasures of South Indian Vegetarian Cooking.

Review

Tamil Brahmin food relies more on the taste of individual vegetables, cooked gently with carefully matched seasonings, which fits in comfortably with the Japanese culinary ethos. The fact that Kurumi and her friends having travelled all the way from Tokyo are in the kitchen of Viji, learning how to make a perfect semiya upma is indicative of the fact that we are poised at the beginning of a new wave: foodies travelling the world to learn cooking from individual households, recipe hunters leaving no page unturned in their quest for something new, cooks tracking down each other to swap techniques. Thanks to the Internet, with blogs, you-tube and websites, all this knowledge is quickly available to everyone. Whoever thought a vendaikkai thayir pachadi could travel so far, so fast, so flamboyantly. --The Hindu Newspaper - 2009

FUSION IN THE KITCHEN South Indian recipes are now on a gastronomic journey to the Orient. Young Kurumi Arimoto balances carefully on her toes, and stirs the carrot mundhiri payasam. Maiko Shimizu fiddles with a nifty camera, capturing the moment. Meanwhile, Akemi Yoshii, ponders over translating 'araithu vitta thakaali vengaaya sambhar' into Japanese. In the middle of the kitchen, cookbook writers Padmini Natarajan and Viji Varadarajan simultaneously try explaining everything from ghee-making to how American frozen spinach cubes make for 'mulagu kootu' that is 'out of this world.' Welcome to the new global culinary classroom. Kurumi, the daughter of Japanese cookbook writer Yoko Arimoto, has written one recipe book and is currently working on another. Her fascination for Tamil Brahmin cooking is what led her to Viji s kitchen and 'kadais'. Maiko is a professional writer, photographer and radio presenter. She runs the website and is working on recording and collating Kurumi s culinary adventures in Chennai for a travel-food story, for her website. The link that brought everyone together is Akemi, Japanese translator with a Chennai software company, she is also a freelance food writer with a Masters degree in Gastronomy from the University of Adelaide, Australia. This is their first introduction to home made Indian food. Yet, all three state that while Viji s cooking is exotic, it is not unfamiliar. As Kurumi deftly makes 'kuzhakattais' stuffed with moist coconut and crumbly jaggery, they talk of how similar these are to Japanese wantons, and those ever-popular dimsums found in every chinatown in the world. Kurumi plans to work on popularising this kind of fresh, easy South Indian home cooking in Japan once she is back, because she feels it fits in well with Japanese traditions. 'Our staple diet is rice and our food taste is also mild and fresh.' Despite Indian food s reputation for being high on spice and chillies, Tamil Brahmin food relies more on the taste of individual vegetables, cooked gently with carefully matched seasonings, which fits in comfortably with the Japanese culinary ethos. As recipes and kitchen tips are swapped, Kurumi and Viji cook their way through an elaborate lunch. Eventually everyone s tucking enthusiastically into the 'sutta kathirikkai gotsu', made with carefully smoked brinjal and twanging with the distinctive flavour of 'hing' paired with fragrant 'venn pongal'. 'We do not eat Japanese food everyday,' says Akemi, talking of the various kinds of cuisine available in Tokyo. 'Indian food is our favourite and we even have our own curry!' However, South Indian restaurants are rare in Japan. The few Indian restaurants that move beyond the flaming red curry '. Although chicken tikka and greasy curry tend to represent India in places like London and New York, these cities are also cosmopolitan enough to nurture change. In many of the world capitals, Indian food is ceasing to be defined by the curries, naans and kebabs of North India. Regional food is getting popular, as Indian chefs introduce the world to the likes of Kerala beef fry, Goan prawn balchao and Chettinad chicken. However, the fact that Kurumi is in a brahmin kitchen, learning how to make a perfect 'semiya upma' is indicative of the fact that we are poised at the beginning of a new wave: foodies travelling the world to learn cooking from individual households, recipe hunters leaving no page unturned in their quest for something new, cooks tracking down each other to swap techniques. Thanks to the Internet, with blogs, YouTube and websites, all this knowledge is quickly available to everyone. Who ever thought a 'vendaikkai thayir pachadi'travel so far, so fast, so flamboyantly? --Shonali Muthalaly for The Hindu - April 2009

Samayal is a good South-Indian cook book and every housewife will surely like to refer to it regularly --The Hindu Newspaper

About the Author

Besides writing cookbooks, the author is extremely fitness conscious. She has learnt 3 classical dance forms of India, reads historical fiction and has a love for languages. She also loves listening to classical Indian music. She teaches sathvic cuisine to expats that include French, Thai, Germans, Japanese and Italians. She has co-authored a French cookbook with Sophie Girot - 'Saveurs Subtitles du Sud de l'Inde' that has won them a Gourmand award in 2010.

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter mobile phone number.



Product details

  • Paperback: 152 pages
  • Publisher: Orient Enterprises; 6th edition (20 September 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 8175251743
  • ISBN-13: 978-8175251748
  • Package Dimensions: 24 x 17.8 x 0.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: Be the first to review this item
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #2,30,454 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • Would you like to tell us about a lower price?
    If you are a seller for this product, would you like to suggest updates through seller support?


Customer reviews

There are no customer reviews yet.
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most helpful customer reviews on Amazon.com

Amazon.com: 4.3 out of 5 stars 35 reviews
MK
5.0 out of 5 starsGood Eats South Indian Style!
24 November 2012 - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
4 people found this helpful.
Gaya Laflamme
5.0 out of 5 starsMy mother's recipes
9 March 2010 - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
5 people found this helpful.
NowIKnow
5.0 out of 5 starsSimply the best book for South Indian Food (vegetarian)
8 August 2006 - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
10 people found this helpful.
Regina
5.0 out of 5 starsBeautiful font and pictures
16 May 2018 - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
Platypus Ganesh
5.0 out of 5 starsThe recipes are all very easy to follow and quick to prepare
1 November 2017 - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase

Where's My Stuff?

Delivery and Returns

Need Help?