Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter mobile phone number.

Digital List Price:    254.00
Kindle Price:    137.16

Save    116.84 (46%)

includes free wireless delivery via Amazon Whispernet

These promotions will be applied to this item:

Some promotions may be combined; others are not eligible to be combined with other offers. For details, please see the Terms & Conditions associated with these promotions.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Karachi, You're Killing Me! by [Imtiaz, Saba]
Kindle App Ad

Karachi, You’re Killing Me! Kindle Edition

3.5 out of 5 stars 11 customer reviews

See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
   137.16

Length: 272 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
Page Flip: Enabled Language: English

Learn more about purchasing Kindle eBooks

Customers can now buy over 3 million Kindle books on Amazon.in with Indian credit/debit cards, net banking and Amazon.in Gift cards. > Learn More

Product description

Review

Saba Imtiaz has taken good care in keeping the narrative true to life in Karachi. The subtleties of her interactions with policemen, rickshaw drivers, guards etc leave a refreshing impression about a city where life moves at a very fast pace. Readers would find this book interesting in 50 years time as well, when it will have a historic element to life in karachi. --By usman zia on April 10, 2014

It is not ground breaking, or earth shattering novel. A regular novel, by all means. What i loved about it was the details on Karachi and other parts of Pakistan. Being an Indian, all of it sounded strangely familiar and was easily related to. --By Ashutosh Dhar on June 14, 2014

For a long time, those interested in Pakistan (or South Asia in general) have had to be content with a series of fairly overwritten/overwrought novels. Not many voice this frustration in public, but I doubt I am the only one to feel it. Our wait is over. 'Karachi, You're Killing Me' is a tour-de-force rampage of a novel that tears through the realities of living in a metropolis-mega-city like Karachi as a twenty-something female journalist. From tracking down disappeared political prisoners to the travails of covering fashion week, Saba Imtiaz brings the city to life in a way that no book (with the possible exception of Mohammad Hanif's Our Lady of Alice Bhatti) has so far. --By Alex Strick van Linschoten on March 2, 2014

Product Description

Ayesha is a twenty-something reporter in one of the world’s most dangerous cities. Her assignments range from showing up at bomb sites and picking her way through scattered body parts to interviewing her boss’s niece, the couture-cupcake designer. In between dicing with death and absurdity, Ayesha despairs over the likelihood of ever meeting a nice guy, someone like her old friend Saad, whose shoulder she cries on after every romantic misadventure. Her choices seem limited to narcissistic, adrenaline-chasing reporters who’ll do anything to get their next story—to the spoilt offspring of the Karachi elite who’ll do anything to cure their boredom. Her most pressing problem, however, is how to straighten her hair during the chronic power outages.
Karachi, You’re Killing Me! is Bridget Jones’s Diary meets The Diary of a Social Butterfly—a comedy of manners in a city with none.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 709 KB
  • Print Length: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Vintage Books; 1st edition (24 February 2014)
  • Sold by: Amazon Asia-Pacific Holdings Private Limited
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00I91RURI
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Screen Reader: Supported
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars 11 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #15,005 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  • Would you like to tell us about a lower price?


What other items do customers buy after viewing this item?

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Being a journalist can say that the story is very real. It is a must read for the one who wants to know about the world of a news reporters.their travails and triumphs. I am trying not to give away much but very tempted to say that I know the feeling of a potentially life changing story never seeing the light of the day. Saba has kept it very raw and real.
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending Feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Happy that i went for the book instead of the movie...enjoyed...no regrets...
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending Feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By me on 17 April 2017
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is not a path breaking book.. but it achieves what it is meant to.. its entertaining. The protagonist is someone most wld relate to. The sarcastic one liners make it worth the read
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending Feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Yes it did. IT was a nice read and got lot to know about the all thr journalist's hectic lives. Ayesha's character was relatable and the friendship with Saad was very cute!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending Feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Ayesha, a journalist for a daily newspaper in Karachi has a professional life that is nobody’s envy. Non existent love life can only add to her misery. Luckily she has good friends. Those that appear with drinks at her doorstep, give her free and valuable advice and do not expect an explanation for a botched up situation that Ayesha lands herself in. Her choices in men, most of the times lean towards bad or absolutely disastrous. Her boss Kamran gives her just about anything to report and is indirectly responsible for a lot of misery. Yet, it’s a life she wouldn't give up for anything else.

Chicklit at heart, Karachi, You’re Killing Me is Saba Imtiaz’s love letter to the city. It’s very evident from the start that while Ayesha might be the protagonist, it is the city Karachi that is the central character of the book. From frequent bombings to the intellectual lit fest, from political rallies to religious flavoured fashion shows, there is a little bit of everything in the plot.

Saba Imtiaz’s characters sound a lot like Jane Austen’s characters let loose in a developing country with access to booze and Whatsapp. A story that is empowering and non preachy in quality, it’s also likeable and very relate-able. It’s true that we all make wrong choices, continue at jobs with ungrateful bosses and fight with friends over trivial issues. These when turned into subject for a book, can only make for a very interesting reading.

Laugh riot that deserves to be read!
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending Feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
By Saba Imtiaz. Grade C

Saba Imtiaz’s debut is classic chick-lit – and I do not mean that as a compliment. Complete with a chronically single woman who drinks too much and has a career that refuses to take off, a gorgeous-but-platonic best friend AND a cat, this book should be titled If Bridget Jones Had Been Written in Pakistan.

Ayesha is a journalist working her ass off among slimy, smarmy masochists in Karachi, and has been waiting for her big break for quite a while now. Her love life is in the bin, and at 28, her colleagues and friends are rising and shining in their respective careers, while the only relationship she has is with her bootlegger. Things start looking up when she bumps into the gorgeous gora and CNN reporter Jamie. His interest in her causes much anxiety and butterflies (it’s been two hours! Why hasn’t he called yet? Is he not as into me as I’d thought? But he said he was. Should I call him? But I don’t want to appear too clingy. WHY HASN’T HE CALLED YET? *Checks phone some more, stalks him on social media, thinks of dropping by his hotel room on some pretext*)

Difficult to imagine a ‘successful, smart and independent’ twenty eight year old woman – or even anyone out of their teenage – being this tied up over a gorgeous face she has met once. The protagonist more than once came across as a self-obsessed whiny sixteen year old playing grown up. The first half is filled with cribbing about everything – Karachi, the lack of sex, the poor liquor, her job, her cat, even detailed comments about the sucky weather. When it finally looks like she is about to get her big break and is trailing a story, she can’t resist bragging and talks about it with fellow journalist Jamie, who later steals it and is showered with limelight.
Read more ›
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending Feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
click to open popover

Look for similar items by category