Digital List Price:    297.36
Kindle Price:    288.19

Save    820.81 (74%)

inclusive of all taxes

includes free wireless delivery via Amazon Whispernet

These promotions will be applied to this item:

Some promotions may be combined; others are not eligible to be combined with other offers. For details, please see the Terms & Conditions associated with these promotions.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Kindle App Ad
Effective Programming: More Than Writing Code by [Atwood (Coding Horror), Jeff]

Effective Programming: More Than Writing Code Kindle Edition

3.9 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews

See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from
Kindle Edition
   288.19

Length: 278 pages Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled Page Flip: Enabled
Language: English

Product description

Product Description

ABOUT THE BOOK

Jeff Atwood began the Coding Horror blog in 2004, and is convinced that it changed his life. He needed a way to keep track of software development over time - whatever he was thinking about or working on. He researched subjects he found interesting, then documented his research with a public blog post, which he could easily find and refer to later. Over time, increasing numbers of blog visitors found the posts helpful, relevant and interesting. Now, approximately 100,000 readers visit the blog per day and nearly as many comment and interact on the site.

Effective Programming: More Than Writing Code is your one-stop shop for all things programming. Jeff writes with humor and understanding, allowing for both seasoned programmers and newbies to appreciate the depth of his research. From such posts as "The Programmer's Bill of Rights" and "Why Cant Programmers... Program?" to "Working With the Chaos Monkey," this book introduces the importance of writing responsible code, the logistics involved, and how people should view it more as a lifestyle than a career.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

- Introduction
- The Art of Getting Shit Done
- Principles of Good Programming
- Hiring Programmers the Right Way
- Getting Your Team to Work Together
- The Batcave: Effective Workspaces for Programmers
- Designing With the User in Mind
- Security Basics: Protecting Your Users' Data
- Testing Your Code, So it Doesn't Suck More Than it Has To
- Building, Managing and Benefiting from a Community
- Marketing Weasels and How Not to Be One
- Keeping Your Priorities Straight

EXCERPT FROM THE BOOK

As a software developer, you are your own worst enemy. The sooner you realize that, the better off you'll be.I know you have the best of intentions. We all do. We're software developers; we love writing code. It's what we do. We never met a problem we couldn't solve with some duct tape, a jury-rigged coat hanger and a pinch of code. But Wil Shipley argues that we should rein in our natural tendencies to write lots of code:

The fundamental nature of coding is that our task, as programmers, is to recognize that every decision we make is a trade-off. To be a master programmer is to understand the nature of these trade-offs, and be conscious of them in everything we write.In coding, you have many dimensions in which you can rate code: Brevity of codeFeaturefulnessSpeed of executionTime spent codingRobustnessFlexibility

Now, remember, these dimensions are all in opposition to one another. You can spend three days writing a routine which is really beautiful and fast, so you've gotten two of your dimensions up, but you've spent three days, so the "time spent coding" dimension is way down.So, when is this worth it? How do we make these decisions? The answer turns out to be very sane, very simple, and also the one nobody, ever, listens to: Start with brevity. Increase the other dimensions as required by testing.

I couldn't agree more. I've given similar advice when I exhorted developers to Code Smaller. And I'm not talking about a reductio ad absurdum contest where we use up all the clever tricks in our books to make the code fit into less physical space. I'm talking about practical, sensible strategies to reduce the volume of code an individual programmer has to read to understand how a program works. Here's a trivial little example of what I'm talking about:

if (s == String.Empty)if (s == "")

It seems obvious to me that the latter case is

About the Author

I'm Jeff Atwood. I live in Berkeley, CA with my wife, two cats, three children, and a whole lot of computers. I was weaned as a software developer on various implementations of Microsoft BASIC in the 80's, starting with my first microcomputer, the Texas Instruments TI-99/4a. I continued on the PC with Visual Basic 3.0 and Windows 3.1 in the early 90's, although I also spent significant time writing Pascal code in the first versions of Delphi. I am now quite comfortable in VB.NET or C#, despite the evils of case sensitivity. I'm currently learning Ruby. I consider myself a reasonably experienced Windowsweb software developer with a particular interest in the human side of software development, as represented in my recommended developer reading list. Computers are fascinating machines, but they're mostly a reflection of the people using them. In the art of software development, studying code isn't enough; you have to study the people behind the software, too.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 5726 KB
  • Print Length: 278 pages
  • Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited
  • Publisher: Hyperink Programming and Software Engineering Books (4 July 2012)
  • Sold by: Amazon Asia-Pacific Holdings Private Limited
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B008HUMTO0
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
  • Screen Reader: Supported
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,65,945 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  • Would you like to tell us about a lower price?


Customer reviews

Share your thoughts with other customers
See all 3 customer reviews

Top customer reviews

13 February 2016
Format: Kindle EditionVerified Purchase
8 February 2016
Format: PaperbackVerified Purchase
5 November 2016
Format: Kindle EditionVerified Purchase

Most helpful customer reviews on Amazon.com

Amazon.com: 4.1 out of 5 stars 71 reviews
Amazon Customer
5.0 out of 5 starsInsights about Programming and Professional Life from Someone Who's Lived It
19 August 2015 - Published on Amazon.com
Format: PaperbackVerified Purchase
Meeze
3.0 out of 5 starsMissing code
17 September 2012 - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle EditionVerified Purchase
22 people found this helpful.
N. Krumpe
5.0 out of 5 starsBest as an e-book
3 September 2012 - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle EditionVerified Purchase
12 people found this helpful.
Andrew L. Good
4.0 out of 5 starsCondensed meditations from one of the best tech blogs around
15 April 2016 - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle EditionVerified Purchase
One person found this helpful.
Jeremy Morgan
5.0 out of 5 starsMust read for the career programmer
1 March 2013 - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle EditionVerified Purchase
2 people found this helpful.
click to open popover

Where's My Stuff?

Delivery and Returns

Need Help?