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Themisto Hc-sr501 Adjust Ir Pyroelectric Infrared Pir Motion Sensor Detector Modules, Multi-color, Set of 5

3.7 out of 5 stars 741 ratings

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Currently unavailable.
We don't know when or if this item will be back in stock.
Brand THEMISTO
Colour Multicolor
Power Source Corded Electric
Item Weight 0.02 Pounds

About this item

  • 100% brand new with good quality
  • Product type: hc--sr501 body sensor module
  • Operating voltage range: dc 4.5-20v quiescent current: level output: high 3.3 v /low 0
  • Color: multi-color
  • Package Contents: Set of 5 Adjust Ir Pyroelectric Infrared PIR Motion Sensor Detector Modules
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Themisto Hc-sr501 Adjust Ir Pyroelectric Infrared Pir Motion Sensor Detector Modules, Multi-color, Set of 5


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Product Description

SPN-BFC Adjust Ir Pyroelectric Infrared

With induction blocking time (default setting: 3-4 seconds)

After each induction output (high level to low level), the induction module can set a blocking time immediately, and sense in this time period The device does not receive any induction signal. This function can realize the interval work (induction output time and blocking time), and can be applied to interval detection products; at the same time, this function can effectively suppress various interferences generated during load switching.

SPN-BFC Adjust Ir Pyroelectric Infrared

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3.7 out of 5 stars
3.7 out of 5
741 global ratings

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4.0 out of 5 stars Good product
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Super product
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NightRunner417
5.0 out of 5 stars Oh so very awesome...
Reviewed in the United States 🇺🇸 on 17 February 2016
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NightRunner417
5.0 out of 5 stars Oh so very awesome...
Reviewed in the United States 🇺🇸 on 17 February 2016
These little monsters are GREAT. If you're into DIY of any sort, Arduino based or otherwise, you'll love these. First off, they are simple to implement and very effective just as they are. 5VDC, ground and output. One trim pot adjusts trigger threshold, and the other adjusts on-time, which goes from about five seconds (I forget exactly but it's around that or just a bit less) to some whacky figure around a couple of minutes or more. According to the manufacturer's specs, they're good for about 21 feet worth of detection. Again, I can't be totally sure, because I skipped to the end of the book, so to speak:

All that is good, but there's something more, and it makes them absolutely INCREDIBLE. If you look closely at the board, you'll find a spot off to the oppsite side of the controller chip, that was clearly meant for two pin headers. I had a close look at the topside of the board where the PIR sensor is mounted to, and found that one of the traces going to this unused pin header spot comes from the side of the PIR sensor. SO, naturally, I soldered a couple of leftover pin headers to the spot and ran a little test. Sure enough, it connects you right to the output of the PIR sensor itself! Ohhhhhh baby... RIght away, I attached this newly created output to the A0 input of one of my Arduino (Gikfun) Nano boards and set it to plotting a graph using MakerPlot (NICE program!) At first I wasn't impressed because the output was ridiculously noisy, but then a thought occurred to me - what if the USB cable connection to the Nano board was as usual, the source of all that noise? SO, I rigged up a quick NRF24L01+ setup to the Nano and did the feed wirelessly to a second Nano attached to the computer. And again as usual almost all of the noise went away and I was left with a really nice waveform when sensing motion. Then I made the best move ever - I fed my DIY PIR sensor output line into a simple transistor amp made from an MPSA18 high gain, low noise NPN transistor. Holy God, this thing is now difficult to believe. I placed the resulting high gain wireless motion detector rig out on my recycle bin just outside my front door and aimed it at the road about 45' away. This thing doesn't just detect people, it detects CARS as well. I'm not kidding. And it doesn't just show a little bump... man it KILLS it. It shows huge wavy spikes on most of the cars, and catches almost 100% of all vehicle transits, and again that's from 45' - 65' away at the closest. It's insane, I don't know how else to put it. And since I'm using the raw output of the PIR and doing all the signal handling through the Arduinos and the computer, I have absolute control over triggering level and behavior and what to do with positive hits. Add to all that, that it is now a wireless rig, and buddy... the possibilities.... wow. "Pretty damned impressive" is an understatement.

So, about the product, in case you thought I was just going to ramble about DIY stuff... They're cheap, they arrived quickly, no damages that I am aware of although I haven't tested all five of them yet, they lend themselves beautifully to modification and integration, and they work brilliantly. The only thing wrong with them at all is that they #1 don't come with that PIR sensor header already, and #2 they don't apparently come in a ten pack with ten Arduino Nanos, lol. Other than that, you bet I love this purchase, and I'll probably get more someday. JUST DO IT!!

PS: It's very late here and I made all the biggest improvements to the setup long after traffic had died down to about nothing on my road, but tomorrow when things get busy again I'll run another graph and attach it here for your amusement, and I'll put up a shot of the rig itself as well.

Edit 2-17-16: First attached picture is of course counting cars. The detector is about 45' away from the closest lane of the road that my home is on, and the traffic on the far lane is closer to 60' - 65' away from the detector. This was in full daylight, bright sun on a 70F day here in Florida with a moderate breeze, if that makes any difference. Note that the noise level is plenty low compared to the actual hits, all of which are strictly cars. I need to do this again when the school kids are all walking home so that I can see how well it handles human beings at that distance.

Rick NR417
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DangerMouse443
5.0 out of 5 stars These seem good so far
Reviewed in the United States 🇺🇸 on 16 October 2015
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DangerMouse443
5.0 out of 5 stars These seem good so far
Reviewed in the United States 🇺🇸 on 16 October 2015
These seem good so far. Note that you can actually power them from 3.3 volts rather than 5 volts if you wish (despite the description here saying that the operating voltage is 4.5-20V). The BISS0001 chip's datasheet illustrates that it runs at 3V...also the board's 5V (vcc pin) is going to the board's power regulator which shifts it down to 3.3v i.e. the board is running at circa 3.3 volts. O/p is at 3.3V logic levels so there is no need to level shift.

In other words, if you want to run this from a 3.3 voltage source (e.g. the 3.3v from say an Arduino or a Raspberry Pi) then here is a diagram showing the connections. You merely ignore the +5 volt pin and use the Output pin, Ground pin and apply 3.3 volt to the indicated pin in my picture.
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JRobert
4.0 out of 5 stars Worked, but took some figuring out.
Reviewed in the United States 🇺🇸 on 29 November 2016
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JRobert
4.0 out of 5 stars Worked, but took some figuring out.
Reviewed in the United States 🇺🇸 on 29 November 2016
Worked, once I figured out how to use them. They are not breadboard compatible; the back side of the PCB is stuffed with components taller than the header pins. There is a mounting hole at either end of the PCB. Its headers are male; you'll need 3 F-M jumper wires (or ones you make up with a M-M & a F-F, each) to plug them into your Arduino. The silk screen identifying the header pins is on the top side of the board, under the dome. Lift it off carefully; it is held onto the board by a tiny molded pin at each corner. I marked the edge of the PCB with red & black markers next to the 5v & Gnd pins. A jumper selects the trigger mode: 'L' (as mine arrived jumpered) selects to prevent re-triggering during the current on-time. 'H' allows re-triggering; a triggered device will remain on until [trigger-period] it last detects any motion. No documentation comes with the device; others have linked to the data sheet (thank you!). This annotated picture from that datasheet covers the basic How-To.
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systemguy
5.0 out of 5 stars Great bargain, Worked First Time Out of the Box
Reviewed in the United States 🇺🇸 on 13 February 2016
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Zak
1.0 out of 5 stars 2 worked, so 2 stars?
Reviewed in the United States 🇺🇸 on 15 December 2019
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