100% PP 100%25%20PP
   479.00
  • M.R.P.:    599.00
  • You Save:    120.00 (20%)
  • Inclusive of all taxes
FREE Delivery on orders over ₹499.00. Cash on Delivery eligible.
In stock.
Sold by uRead-shop (4.7 out of 5 | 35,167 ratings) and Fulfilled by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Other Sellers on Amazon
Add to Cart
   479.00
FREE Delivery on orders over    499.00. Cash on Delivery eligible. Details
Sold by: Amazing Buy
Add to Cart
   449.00
   85.00 Delivery charge
Sold by: A Mind's Bookstore
Add to Cart
   450.00
   90.00 Delivery charge
Sold by: Book Selection Centre
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more.
See this image

Harivamsha Paperback – 9 Sep 2016

5.0 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from
Paperback, 9 Sep 2016
"Please retry"
   479.00
   449.00

Memorable Books of 2016

Memorable books of 2016 This book is part of our Memorable books of 2016 list. Looking for something great to read? Find more such titles picked by our editor in Fiction, Non-fiction, Children's books, and much more. See more
click to open popover

Frequently Bought Together

  • Harivamsha
  • +
  • Olympus
Total price:   774.00
Buy the selected items together

Product Description

About the Author

Bibek Derbroy is a renowned economist, scholar and translator. He has worked in universities, research institutes, industry and for the government. He has widely published books, papers and articles on economics. As a translator, he is best known for his magnificent rendition of the Mahabharata in ten volumes, published to wide acclaim by Penguin. He is also the author of Sarama and Her Children, which splices his interest in Hinduism with his love for dogs.

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter mobile phone number.



From the Amazon Global Store
100% Genuine products|Price include import duty and tax deposits|Easy Returns|All debit/credit cards accepted See more

Product details

  • Paperback: 608 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Random House India Private Limited; Latest edition (9 September 2016)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0143425986
  • ISBN-13: 978-0143425984
  • Product Dimensions: 14.1 x 3.1 x 21.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #35,200 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
3
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 3 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

By Abhinav Agarwal TOP 500 REVIEWER on 24 November 2016
Verified Purchase
The Harivamsha is final part of the Mahabharata. While it is considered a "Purana", it is also considered part of the Mahabharata - which itself is an "Itihasa" and not a "Purana". Scholars have reconciled these oddities by terming the Harivamsha a "kheel" - appendix - of the Mahabharata.

The Bhandarkar Oriental Research Institute in Pune, over several decades, compiled a Critical Edition of the Mahabharata. The Harivamsha also forms part of this Critical Edition. The critical edition of the Harivamsha contains a shade less than 6000 shlokas – thus bringing the total length of the Critical Edition of the epic to just under 79,000 shlokas.

If you have read the unabridged Mahabharata (I have read Dr. Debroy’s English translation, not the original Sanskrit), you will find the Harivamsha to be different. For one, its narrative has more in common with a Purana than the Mahabharata. Part of this is by design, since as Dr. Debroy informs us, for a Purana to be classified as such, it had to cover five topics – “the “original creation”, the periodic cycles of secondary creation and destruction, the genealogies of gods and the rishis, the eras, and the solar and lunar dynasties.” And that is what you get – especially detailed accounts of genealogies. For example, chapter 8 tells us the story of Martanda and Yamuna, chapter 9 of the Ikshvaku dynasty, chapter 10 of the Raghu dynasty, chapter 11 of the ancestors of Bhishma and Shantanu, and so on. There is also some repetition to be found, but with slight variations – chapter 22 tells us the story of Yayati, but the curses are slightly different. Another difference is the absence of philosophy that otherwise abounds in the main epic.
Read more ›
Comment 9 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending Feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Verified Purchase
Superb - Bibek Debroys translations are masterful. A sublime end to his exquisite Mahabharat series. We should all be grateful that we have amongst us an intellect of Dr Debroys calibre to guide us as we strive to rediscover our long ignored & fascinating Indic heritage.
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending Feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By Dhruv on 20 February 2017
Verified Purchase
Great book
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending Feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 5.0 out of 5 stars 1 review
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The first ever sequel! 24 November 2016
By Abhinav Agarwal - Published on Amazon.com
The Harivamsha is final part of the Mahabharata. While it is considered a "Purana", it is also considered part of the Mahabharata - which itself is an "Itihasa" and not a "Purana". Scholars have reconciled these oddities by terming the Harivamsha a "kheel" - appendix - of the Mahabharata.

The Bhandarkar Oriental Research Institute in Pune, over several decades, compiled a Critical Edition of the Mahabharata. The Harivamsha also forms part of this Critical Edition. The critical edition of the Harivamsha contains a shade less than 6000 shlokas – thus bringing the total length of the Critical Edition of the epic to just under 79,000 shlokas.

If you have read the unabridged Mahabharata (I have read Dr. Debroy’s English translation, not the original Sanskrit), you will find the Harivamsha to be different. For one, its narrative has more in common with a Purana than the Mahabharata. Part of this is by design, since as Dr. Debroy informs us, for a Purana to be classified as such, it had to cover five topics – “the “original creation”, the periodic cycles of secondary creation and destruction, the genealogies of gods and the rishis, the eras, and the solar and lunar dynasties.” And that is what you get – especially detailed accounts of genealogies. For example, chapter 8 tells us the story of Martanda and Yamuna, chapter 9 of the Ikshvaku dynasty, chapter 10 of the Raghu dynasty, chapter 11 of the ancestors of Bhishma and Shantanu, and so on. There is also some repetition to be found, but with slight variations – chapter 22 tells us the story of Yayati, but the curses are slightly different. Another difference is the absence of philosophy that otherwise abounds in the main epic.

The Harivamsha, apart from covering stories of the births of the gods, sages, and kings, goes into some depth of the life and experiences of Krishna as a baby and youth, upto his killing of his evil uncle, Kamsa, and then his education in rishi Sandipani's ashram.

In the same vein of events recurring in the Mahabharata, you have the theme of sacrifices never ending the way their organizers planned. If it was Yudhishthira’s Rajsuya yagya ending with the death of Shishupala at the hands of Krishna, you had the Ashwamedha yagya at the end of the war, ending with the appearance of a half-golden mongoose, who dismissed the sacrifice as “in no way comparable to the one that involved the giving away of one prastha of saktu.” The Mahabharata begins with Janamejaya’s Sarpa Satra (snake sacrifice) ending before its completion. Harivamsha ends with an Ashwamedha yagya (horse sacrifice), but which itself ends with an end being pronounced on all horse sacrifices!

In some ways, Harivamsha is perhaps the first instance of a sequel. Written after the Mahabharata was composed, it sought to fill what would have been a much-perceived need to have a text on the life of Krishna. Krishna as a character makes his appearance in the Mahabharata only at the time of Droupadi’s swayamvar. There is nothing about Krishna’s birth, childhood, or exploits outside of his interactions with the Pandavas. Harivamsha fulfilled that gap. And like all good sequels, how does the Harivamsha end? Souti asks Janamejaya – “What else do you desire that I should speak to you about?”

Thus, was set the stage for the Puranas?